Since a very young age I have always been into nature shows and I came across one series that intrigued me. I forgot what channel is was aired, if I’m not mistaken I believe is was a PBS affiliate. The show illustrated all of the different animals that had born “hustles” that they would perform as a survival technique. Some of them I was already aware of; yet others really shocked me. Here are my favs and what I can remember from my memory of the show.
1. Knapper (Otter)
The female otter brings the baby otter with her as she fishes for food. The mother will dive as the baby will hang out at the surface waiting for mama to return. The hungry male otter lurks from a safe distance watching and waiting for the right moment to make his move. As the mother dives again and again the male snatches the baby keeping it for ransom. The mother must give up her food to get the baby back unharmed. The male counts on the love of the mother to get what he wants; his free and easy meal.

  
2. White Devil (Orchid Mantis)
This angelic, clever little insect is the same colors as a beautiful Orchid. As you look at the flowers all clustered up one of them catches your eye more then the rest. It seems to be glowing, luminous in the flicker of the sunlight. The insects can’t help but be drawn to that one flower. As they fly by hoping to be rewarded with the sweet warm nectar of the flower, the poor prey ends up dinner for this clever beautiful insect. Impersonated-itself as a gorgeous flower. In nature beauty and patience can reap tremendous rewards. 

  
3. Little Black Boss (South African Drongos)  
The drongos does not have the advantage where it is located to get the substance it needs. It’s black, stands out and not as equipped to dig up its own food like the small tan birds called social weavers. This small, sand colored birds with their little pointy beak can easily dig up the tiny insects in the dirt. However is extremely vulnerable to predators, so the “black boss” came up with an innate hustle to get the little tan birds to work for them. The drongos will act as a “look out” for the smaller birds by giving a distinct call. This causes the social weavers to fly around and hide, then when the coast is clear the drongos will give a different call to let them know it’s safe to dig up for food again. Then they will do this several times until the social weavers trust them completely. Then the hustle is on. The drongos gives the “danger” call, the smaller birds fly away thinking danger is near. Then they go the the ground where all the freshly dug grubs are all for the taking. While the social weavers look in confusion but don’t catch on until all their food is eaten.

   
Those are my favs. Do you know any weird or surprising animal hustles? Please share, thanks. 

Credit: PBS Show & Science News Blog

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